Innisfallen Island

Innisfallen Island

Innisfallen Island

Innisfallen Island in Killarney is an Island situated on the Lakes of Killarney made famous for the very important Abbey situated there. Founded in 640 AD by Saint Finian the Leaper it became one of Europe’s great schools of learning. It is also said the Great High King of Ireland Brian Boru was educated here by the Monks. It was Brian Boru who eventually fought the Vikings out of Ireland after a long history of raiding.

The “Annals of Innisfallen” was written here by the Monks and is said to be as valuable as the “Book of Kells” it is now housed in Oxford University in England. Boat trips to Innisfallen are available on request from Ross Castle and it is recommended that you take enough time to explore the Island along with the ruins of the Abbey. From Ross Castle, you can see the Abbey walls in the distance.

Innisfallen Abbey Killarney

Innisfallen Abbey Killarney

Innisfallen and Ross Castle

Innisfallen and Ross Castle

Innisfallen Abbey on Innisfallen Island Killarney

Innisfallen Abbey on Innisfallen Island Killarney

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Ross Castle Killarney

Ross Castle Killarney

Ross Castle Killarney

Ross Castle Killarney is situated on the Lower Lake in Killarney, it looks out at Innisfallen island once a school of learning and home to a most magnificent Abbey founded in 640 AD by Saint Finian the Leaper. It is said that High King of Ireland Brian Boru was educated here. Ross Castle its self was built around the 15th Century and is a spectacular building in an amazing location.

Tours of the Castle are available in season and Boat trips are also available throughout the Tourist Season.

You can drive there, get a Jaunting Car from the Town Centre, rent a bike, Walk.

Irish Castle in Killarney

Irish Castle in Killarney

Ross Castle canon

Ross Castle canon

Ross Castle Killarney

Ross Castle Killarney

View of Ross Castle Killarney

View of Ross Castle Killarney

Ross Castle Ireland

Ross Castle Ireland

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When it Snows in Killarney

When it Snows in Killarney

Snow in Killarney

When it snows in Killarney, Images of snow on the mountains around Killarney.

It doesn’t snow much in Killarney but when it does it becomes a Winter Wonderland with its many Lakes, Rivers, Mountains, Castles and old Abbey’s the whole place becomes even more spectacular.

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Images of Killarney

Images of Killarney

Images of Killarney

Here we have some of the amazing scenes you can experience along with some of the Images of Killarney.

Killarney is a Photographers dream there is always something to photograph regardless of the Weather. If you stay for a few days you will encounter Wildlife, Old Buildings, Castles, Mountain scenes, Lake scenes, Woodlands and much more.

Killarney Hotel Accommodation ….

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Traditional Music in Killarney

Traditional Music in Killarney

Traditional Music in Killarney

 

Traditional Music in Killarney is regularly available and especially in the Months from February to November when there is more demand for it. You can always find somewhere playing Traditional Music, its best to asl locally because most of the bands move from Pub to pub on different nights. There are also Traditional Music shows which offer Food and dining while you enjoy the music.

Below is Derry and Rosie Healy who play in the Lake Hotel’s Devil’s Punchbowl bar every friday evening at 9.30 pm, Derry and Rosie play a local type traditional Music style of their own and have proven to be very popular with the locals and visitors alike.

Derry & Rosie play in the Devil’s Punchbowl Bar in the Lake Hotel. Derry wrote the song on his favourite Kerryman “Tom Crean”

Some Great spots for Traditional Music in Killarney

Killarney play host to several Traditional Irish Pubs. Opening Hours Monday-Thursday is from 10.30am to 11.00pm, Fridays & Saturdays until 12.30 am and on Sundays from 12.30 am to 11.00pm. Closing times on eve of a public holiday is 12.30am. Children are not allowed into pubs after 9pm (10pm during June, July, & August). No smoking allowed in restaurants/pubs or other enclosed public or work place.

The Danny Mann Bar

Have traditional Irish music on Sat and Sun Nights from the months of June to Sept.

The Grand Hotel

Located on Main Street. It is a late bar and have traditional Irish Nights weekdays and weekends during the Bust Season. www.killarneygrand.com

The Failte

Is one of the liveliest bars in Killarney. They have live music every Friday and Saturday night.
Lake Hotel

Located on Muckross Road. The Lake Hotel has live Music, Tues, Fridays, and Saturdays. www.lakehotel.com

Courtney’s Bar

Located on Main Street. Courtney is a favourite amongst locals and tourist as it cater for everyone. It has live music during the weekends and weekdays during the busy months.

Murphy’s Bar

Located on College Street. Weekdays and Weekends live music is played from 9.30pm onwards.

Mustang Sally’s

Late Night Club located on Main Street opened Sun, Mon & Thurs and weekends.

O Connors High Street

This is one of Killarney’s Main Traditional Irish Bar and music is held here during the busy months of the year on weekdays and weekends.

Scott’s Hotel

Located on College Street. It is a lively bar.

INEC Centre
The INEC Centre in Killarney is located on Muckross Road. It is Ireland’

s ‘Premier Convention & Meeting Centre”.  They are host to many famous artists and have weekly entertainment available for people.
www.inec.ie Is the official website that will show you upcoming shows, times and cost of tickets.
Contact Number: 0646671555.

Kate Kearney’s Cottage
Kate Kearney’s Cottage is located just at the entrance of the Gap of Dunloe. Kate Kearney’s Cottage has Traditional Irish Night which consists of Traditional Music, Dinner, and Irish Dancers.
Booking is required. Contact number: 0646644146.www.katekearneyscottage.com

The Liam O Connor Show
The Avenue- the Avenue Play host to The Liam O Connor Show. The Liam O Connor Show runs from the start of May until the end of September. The show commences at around 8.30pm, seating at 8.00pm. Ticket price for Adult is €45.00, Child €44.00 & senior €49.00.
Contact number Avenue Hotel 0646632522.

www.liamoconnormusic.com

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Mangerton Mountain & the Devil’s Punchbowl

Mangerton Mountain & the Devil’s Punchbowl

Mangerton Mountain & the Devil’s Punchbowl

There is nothing like a trip up Mangerton Mountain and the Devil’s Punchbowl, the views are fantastic. The Punchbowl itself is worth it for the views, its a Glacial Lake left here since the Ice Age. There is a pathway that sorrounds the Punchbowl and care must be taken especially in Cold or Cloudy weather. At the top on a clear day you can see as far as Dursey Island, Castlecove, Sneem and the Mountains of the Beara Peninsula, the McGillycuddy Reeks, Torc Mountain, the 3 Lakes of Killarney. You can also see Muckross House, Ross Castle, the Lake Hotel and on towards Glenflesk and Mountains going into Cork.

( Image above shows the Lake Hotel and the Lower Lake in Killarney )

Before attempting to climb Mangerton Mountain please follow normal practices for Irish Mountains in general more information can be found at the following.

http://mountainviews.ie/summit/25/

Safety advise a must read

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Family Run Hotels in Ireland History

Family Run Hotels in Ireland History

 

100 Years of Huggard History as an Irish family Run Hotel

 

 

At the beginning….

Family Run Hotels in Ireland History a glorious chapter in a great Irish Tourism success story is being celebrated this year when the country’s first family-owned hotel chain celebrates 100 years in the hotel and tourism business.

The story began when local farmer, Martin Huggard, purchased the 28-bedroom Bay View Hotel, overlooking the seashore in Waterville, Co Kerry.  Later that year, Martin married Mary Doyle from Aughrim, Co Wicklow, who had trained in hotel management with the Great Southern Hotel Company. And so began the story that was to be at the centre of tourism and hotel development in the decades ahead.  It was not easy in those days – there was no tourism structure in Ireland and the country was going through political turmoil.

The marriage of Martin and Mary Huggard was a big success both on a personal and a business level.  They were blessed with seven children: Noel, Maudie, Hilda, Brendan, Cicely, Billy and Patricia.  Their children went on to leave a hugely positive imprint on Irish tourism in general and on the hotel industry in particular and this has continued through the generations.  Despite it being a ‘mixed’ marriage – Martin was Church of Ireland and Mary a Catholic – when Brendan decided he wanted to be a Catholic Priest, his father gave him his blessing by saying: “Brendan, if you want to be a priest, be a good one”.  And that became the Huggard motto:  “Whatever you do, do it well!”

As hoteliers, they were the perfect match.  Mary was renowned over the years for her unique warmth and hospitality while Martin was highly respected as the business entrepreneur.  A quote from her obituary in the Irish Times  in 1968 said: “The death of Mrs Huggard has removed from the Irish scene an outstanding personality; a woman of great heart and firmness of soul, of whom it can be truly said in the words of the poet, that she made no enemy and lost no friend.  Allied to these qualities were special traits, such as her acumen in business affairs, her vision, her courage and her tireless energy and all of these combined to make her a tower of strength to her husband in the conception of their plans which were to connect their names so closely with hotel development in this country.  The lead which they gave and the success which attended their efforts must surely place them among the pioneers of the hotel industry in Ireland”.

 

Building a chain of family run hotels

Their first move was across the road in Waterville when Martin and Mary acquired the 60 bedroom Butler Arms Hotel in 1917, having sold The Bay View. There they quickly earned an international reputation for excellence that attracted high profile guests including Royalty, Politicians, Ecclesiastics, Ambassadors, Sports stars and big screen icons including Walt Disney and Charlie Chaplin.  The Butler Arms was the starting point from where Martin and Mary acquired many other hotels.

The first acquisition was the beautiful Caragh Lake Hotel outside Killorglin in 1922.  The Caragh Lake Hotel, situated on the lakeshore, was one of the four original Great Southern Hotels.  The Royal Hotel on Valentia Island followed in 1927.  These three hotels were promoted as a group offering interchangeable meals and fishing.  Caragh Lake and The Royal Hotel, Valentia were owned by the Huggards until 1951.

The next expansion came at the start of World War 2 in 1939 when the Irish Government invited Martin and Mary Huggard to restore and run the old Guinness mansion of Ashford Castle in Connemara. Their eldest son, Noel (who had trained in both The Majestic Hotel in Harrogate and The Dorchester in London) subsequently bought Ashford from The Land Commission and transformed it into a Grade A Hotel which he and his wife Angela ran until 1970. Again, this hotel was home to many international guests and it was from here the film “The Quiet Man” featuring John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara” was filmed.

The following year in 1940, Martin and Mary bought the Lake Hotel, (established as a hotel since 1820) on the Lakeshore in beautiful Killarney from the Hilliard Family. The Lake Hotel was run for the next 50 years by Hilda Huggard, until sons of Billy and Hilda’s nephews, Tony, Colman, Niall and Joseph Huggard took over the management of the hotel to continue the line of Huggard Hospitality into a third generation. As well as owning and managing the Lake Hotel to very high standards, Hilda was a driving force in the development of tourism and amenities in Killarney and nationally. She played an important role in Killarney Golf and Fishing Club when it moved to Fossa and, as an enthusiastic bridge player, she founded local bridge clubs and hosted a very successful Bridge Congress at the Lake Hotel which continues to this day.

In 1949, Noel Huggard bought Ballinahinch Castle in Connemara from the Irish Tourist Board which he turned into a hotel still renowned for its wonderful fishing and surroundings.  Ballinahinch was subsequently sold to an American businessman.

Billy Huggard and his wife Mary took over The Butler Arms Hotel from his parents  where they continued the Huggard traditions. They ran the hotel until the early 1970s when Noel‘s son Peter and his wife Mary purchased it.  Peter and Mary are still involved in the business with their two daughters, Louise and Paula Huggard, now representing the fourth generation of Huggards at the Butler Arms Hotel.

The Butler Arms Hotel in Waterville and The Lake Hotel in Killarney are the two hotels still in Huggard ownership.

 

Entrepreneurs

Both Martin and Mary Huggard were entrepreneurs with a vision.  The heritage that goes with this 100 year history is testimony to their business acumen.  They embraced the opportunity offered by the trans-Atlantic route of the Cable Station in Valentia Island and Waterville and turned a local hotel into an international destination that became the Butler Arms Hotel in Waterville.  The technology of the early 1900s has been used to effect with the generations that followed into the digital era of the 21st Century.

In turn Martin and Mary brought their commitment to hard work, their business acumen and their great sense of hospitality to each hotel they acquired and instilled these qualities in their children which have been passed down the line to the present generations.

The success of The Huggard hotels was even more staggering when you consider they were bought at a time of war and/or political instability.  All were bought between 1912 and 1949 which history shows were recessionary times.  No subsidies for hotels existed in those times!

 

Social Duties

The Huggard hotels employed and trained hundreds of local employees to very high standards over the decades.  These people contributed greatly to the success of each hotel and had great loyalty to their employers.  To this day relatives of those who worked with Martin and Mary call back with pride to tell the present generation where their relative worked.

Any training gained at a Huggard hotel equipped people to emigrate with skills to hotels and resorts; to shipping companies and tourism companies all over the world.  The Huggards also used their international relationships to place people abroad for further training.

 

Birth of Tourism in Ireland

In 1946, Mary Huggard was a founding director of the first Irish Tourist Board and later Fógra Fáilte .  Using her hotel experience for the better of others, she was also a member of the Executive Council of the Irish Hotels Federation for many years.   Mary and Martin also worked hard at their own expense to promote Irish tourism abroad.

Noel Huggard played his part as a Director of Bord Fáilte in the 1950/60s and also as a consultant advising hotel and guest house owners on how to improve their facilities.  Noel was also appointed a Director of the Irish Sugar Company, the fore-runner of Bord Bia with an emphasis the promotion of fresh Irish Food grown locally.

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Hotel Gift Vouchers Killarney

Hotel Gift Vouchers Killarney

Hotel Gift Vouchers in Killarney

Looking for Gift Vouchers, we have a great selection of Gift Vouchers to offer

Get your Killarney Hotel gift Vouchers here…..

Lake Hotel Voucher

Lake Hotel Voucher

The Lake Hotel cash voucher can be used for any services offered at the hotel including accommodation, bar and restaurant.

Classic Afternoon Tea for One

Classic Afternoon Tea for One

Enjoy our mouth-watering Afternoon Tea selection in the elegance of the Piano Lounge overlooking the lakes.

Classic Afternoon Tea for Two

Classic Afternoon Tea for Two

Enjoy our mouth-watering Afternoon Tea selection in the elegance of the Piano Lounge overlooking the lakes.

Low Season 2BB1D Voucher

Low Season 2BB1D Voucher

Enjoy two nights accommodation in a standard woodland view room, breakfast each morning and dinner on one evening in the elegant Castlelough Restaurant.

High Season 2BB1D

High Season 2BB1D

Enjoy two nights accommodation in a standard, woodland view room with breakfast each morning and dinner on one evening in the elegant Castlelough Restaurant. Voucher is for two persons.

Beauty Treatments

Treatments

Select any amount for a treatment voucher which can be used in The Lake  Treatment Rooms.

Table d'hote Dinner in The Castlelough Restaurant - 2 courses

Table d’hote Dinner in The Castlelough Restaurant – 2 courses

Relax in the elegant hotel dining room, the Castlelough Restaurant and enjoy the best of fine Irish food and wine. This voucher offers 1 person two courses from the table d’hote menu.

Table d'hote Dinner in The Castlelough Restaurant - 3 courses

Table d’hote Dinner in The Castlelough Restaurant – 3 courses

Relax in the elegant hotel dining room, the Castlelough Restaurant and enjoy the best of fine Irish food and wine. This voucher offers 1 person three courses from the table d’hote menu.

Killarney Hotel Gift Vouchers

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Brandon Point to Sauce Creek

Brandon Point to Sauce Creek

Brandon Point to Sauce Creek

Barrels of Rum, Shipwrecks and no return for anything that goes in and add a landslide. I had been to Brandon Point before many times but this time I decided to trek over to Sauce Creek.

Brandon point     52°17’15.95″N     10° 9’38.06″W 

The walk close to the Coast is marked by poles a few hundred meters apart, its a fair walk with a lot of climbing and was very wet underfoot especially when you are away from the cliffs. On the trail, you will pass quietly a few remains of old settlements in different areas. It looks like it was well populated many years ago. When you get to Sauce Creek, it is spectacular, its horseshoe shapes its 300-meter cliffs the Atlantic waves breaking the wind and just the sheer space, it’s really amazing.

I continued down to the right side of the Creek where the views are even more spectacular and came across the famous landslide that took place in recent years (image) don’t go to close it is still quite unstable ground.

Sauce Creek landslide

Sauce Creek landslide

Climbing back up and I went the whole way around the Creek it was extremely windy and hard going at times especially when I was getting nearer the Ocean on the Westside, it gets quite steep at times and when you are close to being as far as you can go it is tough going on the heather. I had passed some serious open bog holes, some farmers had sheep wire to stop sheep from falling in so be careful of the open ones they look to be bottomless. Next, I went to another old settlement I could see to the South West it was hard going in the thick mountain heather and drops down into a valley. When I got there I could see what looks like trails which could have been made from a large number of wild Goats in the area but I would have preferred an easier way to get to where I was now. There is a trail which will bring you back to Teer and Brandon village by staying on the old roadway, but I picked a point midway over Sauce creek as my next point and continued so I could pick up the trail back to the car park at Brandon Point.

West side Sauce Creek

Westside Sauce Creek

As you can see from the Image it is tough going on the Heather, to the left you have a great view of the landslide (image above) There is no doubt it is a very interesting spot, there was a settlement living in the Creek up to the 1800s and a recent storm washed much of the fields away.

Old Village Sauce Creek

Old Village Sauce Creek

As you walk the trails you will come across various old settlements in the middle of nowhere, you can only imagine what hardship they lived through in their daily lives, its no place for the weak, the weather and terrain is quietly inhospitable today with Gortex and Proper Boots, what was it like in their day. They were obviously great people and well able to adapt to the conditions.

When I got back to Brandon point I had 17 km on my walking app on my phone, i went of the worn pathways a bit but it felt hard going at times, if I were to do it again I would stay on the trails as we always learn the hard way and should know there are there for a reason.

Enjoyable but tough would prefer it after a dry spell, even more, amazing views so bring your camera.

Brandon point Dingle Peninsula

Brandon point Dingle Peninsula

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